Tag Archives: T.S. Eliot

La Figlia Che Piange(The Weeping Girl)

impressionistic painting girl

Stand on the highest pavement of the stair –
Lean on a garden urn –
Weave, weave the sunlight in your hair –
Clasp your flowers to you with a pained suprise –
Fling them to the ground and turn
With a fugitive resentment in your eyes:
But weave, weave the sunlight in your hair.

So I would have had him leave,
So I would have had her stand and grieve,
So he would have left
As the soul leaves the body torn and bruised,
As the mind deserts the body it has used.
I should find
Some way incomparably light and deft,
Some way we both should understand,
Simple and faithless as a smile and a shake of the hand.

She turned away, but with the autumn weather
Compelled my imagination many days,
Many days and many hours:
Her hair over her arms and her arms full of flowers.
And I wonder how they should have been together!
I should have lost a gesture and a pose.
Sometimes these cogitations still amaze
The troubled midnight, and the noon’s repose.

— T. S. Eliot

Caffeinated Links: Emma Watson and Miles Teller Costar, 10 Most Anticipated 2015 Poetry Books

Miles-Teller whiplash

Emma Watson and Miles Teller are almost certainly going to star together in Damian Chazelle’s next project, an oldschool MGM-style musical set in LA called La La Land. Damian Chazelle’s Whiplash, which was my favorite movie of 2014 along with Guardians of the Galaxy, just got five Oscar nominations. Emma Watson is one of my favorite people for her fierce, poised, intelligent self, and Miles Teller is my favorite 20-something actor after his knockout, charismatic, incredibly human performance as a drummer prodigy in Whiplash. THIS is a dream. RT

Flavorwire has the 10 Most Anticipated Poetry Books of 2015. “Although many books aren’t slated until later in the first quarter, 2015 is already shaping up to be a major year for American poetry, especially with the return of favorites like Mary Jo Bang, new collected works from masters like Jorie Garaham, and a book from perhaps our greatest living poet, John Ashbery. Add to this mix the rediscovery (or first translation) of forgotten yet undeniably major poets like Alejandra Pizarnik and the arrival of younger poets like Uljana Wolf, and it’s clear that poetry in America is firing on all cylinders.” RT

Flavorwire also killed it with a beautiful retrospective on T.S. Eliot’s quintessential “The Love Song of J.Alfred Prufrock.” “Thomas Stearns Eliot began writing “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” in 1910, at the age of twenty-two. The poem was published five years later, when Ezra Pound, whom Eliot met and befriended as an expatriate in Europe, sent it to Poetry in Chicago, adding: “This is as good as anything I’ve ever seen.” This year, then, marks the 100 year anniversary of Prufrock’s imaginative journey into the half-deserted streets, the one-night cheap hotels, and the chambers of the sea.” RT

Blinkboxx Books created an infographic of the ages at which famous authors were first published and first hit it big, respectively, and it’s  both fascinating and highly encouraging for aspiring novelists. “Haruki Murakami hitting his stride at 34 with A Wild Sheep Chase and Gabriel Garcia Marquez penning One Hundred Years of Solitude at 41, so don’t give up hope yet—or ever.” RT

Benedict Cumberbatch talks baby names with Ellen Degeneres. RT

Rainy Afternoon

rainy afternoon

by Hello Twigs

stirring dull roots with spring rain – T.S. Eliot

Illustration Love: Adventuretime

erinmcguire_firewoodcolor2

Do I dare disturb the universe?

Illustration by Erin McGuire

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Throwback time.

sea2

S’io credesse che mia risposta fosse
A persona che mai tornasse al mondo,
Questa fiamma staria senza piu scosse.
Ma perciocche giammai di questo fondo
Non torno vivo alcun, s’i’odo il vero,
Senza tema d’infamia ti rispondo.

LET us go then, you and I,
When the evening is spread out against the sky
Like a patient etherized upon a table;
Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets,
The muttering retreats
Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels
And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells:
Streets that follow like a tedious argument
Of insidious intent
To lead you to an overwhelming question….
Oh, do not ask, “What is it?”
Let us go and make our visit.

In the room the women come and go
Talking of Michelangelo.

The yellow fog that rubs its back upon the window-panes,
The yellow smoke that rubs its muzzle on the window-panes
Licked its tongue into the corners of the evening,
Lingered upon the pools that stand in drains,
Let fall upon its back the soot that falls from chimneys,
Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap,
And seeing that it was a soft October night,
Curled once about the house, and fell asleep.

Continue reading

Caffeinated Links: Catching Fire Book Cover, T.S. Eliot, Inside Llewyn Davis Music

animatedhungergames

Julian Peters’ illustrations of T.S. Eliot’s The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock are among the most beautiful things I’ve ever seen. RT

This “book covers come to life” – animated book covers – series is not just breathtaking, but also the way of the future – one day very soon we’ll walk into bookstores and the book covers will be animated. RT

Millenials in American aren’t the only ones desperate for jobs – it’s the same in Europe, according the New York Times writing about a generation “Young and Educated in Europe, but Desperate for Jobs

100 Notable Books from 2013, RT

Ruth Engel reviews the Inside Llewyn Davis soundtrack – “The album itself is lovely – Oscar Isaac’s voice is so compelling that I’m sure his performance in the movie will be beyond reproach even if he doesn’t act at all. It includes a number of instantly recognizable folk standards, including one of my all-time favorites,” 500 Miles.” Marcus Mumford collaborates on an aching version of “Fare Thee Well (Dink’s Song)” that contains no frenetic banjo strumming, and Chris Thile and the Punch Brothers bring warmth and a fiddle into the mix.” RT

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