Tag Archives: storytelling

10 Quotes on Creativity: Kafka, Rilke, Doctor Who and more

Way to Success

1. First of all, don’t worry about the money. Love the process. You don’t know when it’s gonna happen. Louis C.K. started hitting in his 40s; he’d been doing it for 20 years. And don’t settle. I don’t want to ever hear, “It’s good enough.” Then it’s not good enough. Don’t ever underestimate your audience. They can tell when it isn’t true. Also: Ignore your competition. A Mafia guy in Vegas gave me this advice: “Run your own race, put on your blinders.” Don’t worry about how others are doing. Something better will come.” –  Joan Rivers

2.  In short, this has been my strategy, though I’m worse at ‘pruning’ than I should be. Consume widely, create with focus, and you’ll see that the novel connections and solutions will follow naturally. You will have the broad base of material and information that allows for new, interesting applications paired with the practiced skill of a technician in your execution. -Erich Campbell, Create with Focus

3. The only thing that makes one an artist is making art. And that requires the precise opposite of hanging out; a deeply lonely and unglamorous task of tolerating oneself long enough to push something out. ―David Rakoff, Half Empty

4. Don’t bend; don’t water it down; don’t try to make it logical; don’t edit your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense obsessions mercilessly.  -Franz Kafka

5. Inspiration is for amateurs–the rest of us just show up and get to work. – Chuck Close (painter)

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Quotidian: Erin Morgenstern on Storytelling

World of Books Bookstore photo

Book Piles of Magic

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“Someone needs to tell those tales. When the battles are fought and won and lost, when the pirates find their treasures and the dragons eat their foes for breakfast with a nice cup of Lapsang souchong, someone needs to tell their bits of overlapping narrative. There’s magic in that. It’s in the listener, and for each and every ear it will be different, and it will affect them in ways they can never predict. From the mundane to the profound. You may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows what they might do because of it, because of your words. That is your role, your gift. Your sister may be able to see the future, but you yourself can shape it, boy. Do not forget that… there are many kinds of magic, after all.”

― Erin Morgenstern, The Night Circus

Illustration Love: Kenny Park

My discovery of the day is illustrator Kenny Park, who is signed with Shannon Associates who generally have pretty great taste in artists. There’s something so immediately compelling about his work, a touch of broody surrealism and a style of world-building that is simple but just strange enough to draw you in. His latest series is based on Hermes. kennyparkillustration

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All images via Shannon Associates

Illustration Love: Dream Fort

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Dream Fort” by Erin McGuire

Caffeinated Links: Lizzie Bennet Diaries, The Problem with Moffat’s Sherlock, Poverty and Television

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The A.V.  Club on LBD – “Although the basic structure and format of The Lizzie Bennet Diaries is what garnered it media attention and critical acclaim, ultimately its stories are what connected with audiences. Without them, this would have just been an experiment.” RT

David R at Unreality wrote a long article encapsulating exactly the problem with Sherlock, Doctor Who, and Moffat’s writing. “More than anything, this season just felt like one long bit of fanservice. I mean that both in the minor sense — like the recurring gags about phrases to put on a t-shirt — as well as in larger story beats. I’ve never seen a moment more desperate to be put on tumblr than that bit in “Sign of Three” when Sherlock, for no reason and completely out of character, decides to prance about in a bearskin hat. That wasn’t Sherlock, it was Doctor Who.” RT

Russell Brand wrote a startingly articulate and powerful article based on his own history of drug abuse for The Guardian a while back. “The mentality and behaviour of drug addicts and alcoholics is wholly irrational until you understand that they are completely powerless over their addiction and unless they have structured help they have no hope… I look to drugs and booze to fill up a hole in me; unchecked, the call of the wild is too strong” RT

Dustin Rowles writes brilliant pop commentary blended with real life, as usual. “But where Shameless especially gets it right is not in the setting, or even the circumstances, but in the way that bad luck seems to follow you everywhere you go when you’re poor. You’re doubly fucked, not just because you’re without money, but because being poor puts you in circumstances in which it’s almost impossible to succeed. If you finally get a job that pays above minimum wage, for instance, it’s almost guaranteed that your car will break down the next day, and you’ll lose that job because you can’t get there on time. When you’re asked to look presentable for an interview, or a school function, that’s sure to be the day that your sewer line leaks into the water line, and both your bathtub and your shitty washing machine will fill up with sewage. It’s practically inevitable.” RT

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