Tag Archives: women in film

Caffeinated Links: Boyhood’s Oscar Loss, Celebrities Date, the Emotions of Possessions, Women and Star Wars

Milan premiere of 'Cinderella'Lily James and Matt Smith are, adorably, dating. Cheers for British acting royalty coming together! RT

Japanese lifestyle writer Marie Kondo’s book the life-changing magic of tidying up unfolds her philosophy on owning and discarding your possessions. “Kondo’s philosophy is that you should only own things that you love, that everything else is just wasting both physical and emotional space. Although some of her advice can be eyebrow-raising (you’ll see), I decided to commit, following her advice to the letter one Saturday in January.” RT The Millions

EW’s Chris Nashawaty on the Oscar Boyhood loss- “More than anything, I think we’ll remember the movies. 2014 was a great year for them—and the Academy obviously thought so too, judging from the way it spread the love around to several deserving films. That said, while I don’t think anyone will look back years from now and consider Best Picture winner Birdman an embarrassment on par with Crash or Forrest Gump, I do think we’ll all still be wondering how in the hell Boyhood didn’t take it.” RT

But it’s Slate who nailed it. “By nominating Boyhood, the academy gave itself the chance to recognize a movie that is not just good but revolutionary—a film that reconsiders, in surprising and rewarding ways, the medium’s relationship with time, with storytelling, and with its audience. It’s both a singular work—no one but Richard Linklater could have made it—and a universal one, reflecting the elemental formative experiences of nearly every viewer, even those who don’t, on the surface, have a lot in common with Mason or Samantha or Olivia or Mason Sr. It’s the crowning work of a crucial American filmmaker and a profound statement about the lives we live. But the academy gave Best Picture to a movie about an actor’s identity crisis—a movie about, in Mark Harris’ perfect turn of phrase, “someone who hopes to create something as good asBoyhood.”  RT

Fellow Sound on Sight writer Mallory Andrews has a wonderful piece on being a woman and loving Stars Wars – “Holding Out for a Heroine”. “My Leias had one important difference: my versions always included a lightsaber (often stolen from one of my brother’s three Luke Skywalkers). My logic behind this character embellishment was airtight: she was the “other Skywalker,” the sister of the galaxy’s greatest Jedi hero, whose latent Force powers were surely awaiting discovery after the events of the Return of the Jedi. Why wouldn’t she have a lightsaber? The worst unfulfilled promise of Star Wars has always been Yoda’s proclamation that “there is another Skywalker” and the eventual reveal that Leia was this new hope. Her potential is teased (“You have that power too. In time you’ll learn to use it as I have”) but it is never followed through.” RT

Joss Whedon gave Digital Spy a great interview. “Fox’s X-Men property came up, as its home to many notable A-List female heroes — Storm, Rogue, Kitty Pryde, Jean Grey, Mystique — that Marvel Studios cannot use. “The X-Men was the next evolution of the Marvel paradigm back when I was reading it,” said Whedon. “And, you know, because of the metaphor [of] they were dealing with these oppressed people … there really wasn’t a gender bias in the books. As soon as Marvel [Girl, aka Jean Grey] became Phoenix, the most powerful person in the universe, everything was on the table. It was all multicultural and there was no real question of gender in the book. Now, you can look at it and say, ‘Well, this attitude is dated.’ I’m sure that’s the case if I went back to them. But the fact is it was kind of a utopia. I didn’t know it at the time, because I just assumed that’s how things should be done.” RT

“The idea that police use the good cop, bad cop routine is “very Hollywood,” he says. In fact, it’s standard procedure to record interrogations either using video or audio, he says, preventing fishy business. Plus, the police have just as much interest as the public in nabbing the real criminal, Esparza says. “No department wants the image of locking up innocent people.” RT She Can Convince You That You Committed a Crime

Caffeinated Links: Wonder Woman Film, the Brain Predicts Reality, Anna Akhmatova

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Comic by Julia Lepetit and Andrew Bridgman, read the rest of it here

What do you see, a bird or a fish? Fascinating Atlantic article on how the brain works and image illusions- “According to University of Edinburgh philosopher Andy Clark’s masterful 2013 summary of the state of cognitive sciencethis emerging idea about the brain is called the “bidirectional hierarchical network model.” It holds that every level of the brain is engaged in making predictions, so the expectation of seeing a house feeds down through the cortex to the eyes, which are then more likely to perceive a sloping roof instead of something else. But if something is amiss with the prediction, that information gets transmitted and the brain tries to find a better organizational paradigm for the visual input. Knowledge feeds perception and back again. There are loops everywhere strengthening and weakening according to how well they seem to reflect exterior reality” RT

Glorious read from the NYT about a meeting of two brilliant minds. “If you read the poems Akhmatova wrote about that night, you get the impression that they slept together, but, according to Ignatieff, they barely touched. Their communion was primarily intellectual, emotional and spiritual, creating a combination of friendship and love. If friends famously confront the world side by side and lovers live face to face, Berlin and Akhmatova seemed to somehow enact both postures at once. They shared and also augmented each other’s understanding.” RT

Chris Messina talks to Glamour about the future of the Danny/Mindy relationship. “That’s a good question. I’m excited. I think what we can do is, I hope it has kind of a Lucy and Ricky feel to it, where there’s such love, but they still don’t see eye-to-eye on a lot of things. They still get completely annoyed with one another—bickering and fighting—but [have] constant love [for one another]. I think we have an opportunity to show our audience some really fun stuff about couples. It has been a show about dating, and I think the other characters will go on to date and have girlfriends and stuff like that, but I think it’d be fun to show a season of how [a relationship] looks for Mindy and Danny and the silly and crazy things they do together. I think we’ll pick up with seeing them in a good place, but still wrestling with being Mindy and Danny.” RT

Caffeinated Links: Women’s Journeys in Film, Tenenbaum, Kickstarter Novel

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Badass Digest on why women’s journeys in film are always different than men’s – “Socially speaking, we’ve been trained to believe that women are less prone to make mistakes, but there’s this tricky double standard in which we blame them for the ills that befall a man (if a marriage or relationship dissolves)” RT

Pajiba’s Courtney Enlow snark-destroys Chris Brown, and does it good. “And then he starts talking about his class about violence against women. Oh guys. He has some thoughts on it.” RT

Via The Rabbit Room, this looks like an unexpectedly lovely/worthy Kickstarter Project – “Almost ten years ago I put my three kids to bed, told Jamie for the millionth time about my desire to write a novel, and with her blessing dug out my sketch pad to draw the first map of Aerwiar. I turned off the television (this is key) and sat in the recliner with my high school art supplies, eager to tell a story. As with any adventure, had I known how much work and time it would have taken, I might not have had the guts to start. I drew the coastline of Skree on the left, then for some reason on the right I drew another coastline and named the continent Dang.” RT

Everything Tenenbaum. “On Tuesday, New York Magazine TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz will release his sumptuous coffee-table book, The Wes Anderson Collection. The book delves deeply into each of Anderson’s seven films, dissecting every angle and influence with commentary, illustrations, and photography. Every chapter is anchored by a lengthy conversation between Anderson and Seitz about the making of each film.” RT

Caffeinated

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“There’s five different movies there. Let’s make all that content into one movie, and translate into emotions the things that would make guys cringe. Cool, seriously! Too emotional turns people off. They’d rather watch a bunch of people get killed in a massive action sequence. Jim Cameron is great at walking the line of emotion, heart and commercial filming. I hope people will be inspired to write and get out there and put our voice out there. [Women] need more content. Support it.” – Michelle Rodgriguez, in a Comic-con panel that included Maggie Q, Tatiana Maslany, and other female action stars- Women Kick Ass at Comic-Con, RT Indiewire

“Mike Kruger, author of Canon Revisited: Establishing the Origins and Authority of the New Testament Books (Crossway, 2012) and the forthcoming The Question of Canon: Challenging the Status Quo in the New Testament Debate (IVP, 2013), has a helpful series on the New Testament canon, linked below, “designed to help Christians understand ten basic facts about its origins.  This series is designed for a lay-level audience and hopefully could prove helpful in a conversation one might have with a skeptical friend.”– 10 Basic Facts About the NT Canon that Every Christian Should Memorize, RT The Gospel Coalition  

“I wish I still had the picture, but I will never lose the impression bestowed upon me by that generous, exultant animal on that long-ago day, when I most needed to be reminded that happiness is not an intellectual choice, it’s an instinct, and a good in itself.” – A Lesson in the Desert, RT The New York Times

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